RESOURCES

2008

  • Plan International, Paying the Price: The Economic Cost of Failing to Educate Girls
    Paying the Price: The Economic Cost of Failing to Educate Girls
    Plan International 
  • ugth_toolkit
    A toolkit for mainstreaming gender in higher education in Africa (2008)
    Ten Modules and a Literature Review
  • ugth_resources_savethechild-denm
    A Study on Violence against Girls in Primary Schools and Its Impacts on Girls’ Education in Ethiopia (2008)
    The UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC), the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child and the Ethiopian Constitution proclaim that children are to be protected from any kind of harm, violence or abuse. Despite the legal provisions and efforts to reduce and eliminate violence against children, particularly girls, violence and abuse seem to be widespread in Ethiopia - taking place at home, in schools, and in the community at large.
  • ugth_USAID_res_jan08
    A Qualitative Study to Examine School-Related Gender-Based Violence in Malawi (2008)
    The Safe Schools Program has just released A Qualitative Study to Examine School-Related Gender-Based Violence in Malawi which summarizes the results of a participatory learning and action (PLA) research activity conducted in Malawi’s Machinga District to help raise awareness, involvement, and accountability at national, institutional, community and individual levels of school-related gender-based violence.
  • UNGEI Child Protection Code of Practice (2008)
    Code of practice
  • Young Champions for Education: South Asia UNGEI Regional Training
    Sabita Bhujel welcomed the Young Champions to Nepal to discuss priorities for promoting girls' education in South Asia. Ava Deo Awasthi recalled that South Asia, now poverty stricken and disadvantaged, was once a source of wisdom for the rest of the world. "We have to turn the clock around."
  • Transforming Policy and Practice for Gender in Education (2008)
    A Gender Review of the 2009 EFA Global Monitoring Report
  • Evaluation of MoE/UNICEF’s “Basic Education and Gender Equality Programme” for 2006-2008 Afghanistan (2008)
    The clients for this evaluation; the Swedish and Norwegian governments have provided substantial support to the Afghanistan’s Ministry of Education (MoE) and UNICEF Basic Education and Gender Equality (BEGE) since 2006. The main purpose of this evaluation is to assess if UNICEF’s stated objectives has been accomplished during the evaluated program period (2006-mid 2008).
  • Notes from 2008 EFA Global Monitoring Report: A Review of the Main Gender and Inclusion Issues (2008)
    The GMR is a comprehensive document and covers a wide range of countries and situations. It does attempt a difficult task – to provide an overview illustrated with specific cases. However, the picture which emerges does give many clear signals concerning the issues and the solutions encountered. What is striking about the analysis is not that a great deal off new information emerges. The challenges are not so much in the finding of new solutions but in the successful implementation of known strategies and the creation of pressure on governments to provide what they signed up to in Dakar in 2000. The analysis is particularly helpful where it deals with hard data. The tables and figures are very welcome.
  • UNGEI in Bangladesh Consultation Meeting Report (2008)
    Bangladesh is welcoming the United Nations Girls' Education Initiative (UNGEI) with open arms. This was evident at a two-day Consultation Meeting organized by UNICEF Bangladesh on 16-17 September, 2008. Given the country's achievement in attaining gender parity in enrolments in primary and lower secondary schools, the question arises as to why Bangladesh still needs a network to promote girls' education.

    Stakeholders engaged in the promotion of education, especially of girls, including representatives of the Directorate of Primary Education, partner institutions, NGOs, academia, media, UN agencies, and UNICEF's Young Champions, all came together at the Consultation Meeting to respond to that question. They also came up with the way forward for the UNGEI partnership in Bangladesh.

  • Equity and Inclusion in Education: Tools to support education sector planning and evaluation (2008)
    UNGEI, IATT, GTF and the Disabilities Flagship have developed these tools to support governments, their development partners and other stakeholders to address equity and inclusion in education sector plans. They will be piloted at country level in 2009 and may be revised thereafter.
  • Developing Rights-Based Education SWAps in South Asia: From Evidence to Action
    This publication seeks to support all those who are involved in education SWAps to proactively realize the potential of a SWAp to achieve a comprehensive, rights-based approach.
  • Equals 22: October 2008 (2008)
    Newsletter for Beyond Access: Gender, Education and Development
  • Climate change, children and education for sustainable development: A child-friendly schools approach to adaptation and risk reduction
    Today, more than ever before, children are faced with increasing and chronic degradation of natural resources, greater prevalence and severity of natural disasters, and the growing necessity for forced migration. The main purpose of the Environmental Education Resource Pack (EERP) is to provide a tool which will support countries in strengthening children's knowledge, skills, attitudes and ability to adapt to a changing physical environment, while providing a mechanism to promote and support the use of facilities-based environmental solutions.
  • INEE Minimum Standards Toolkit: Teachers and Other Education Personnel (2008)
    The INEE Minimum Standards present a global framework for coordinated action to enhance the quality of educational preparedness and response, increase access to relevant learning opportunities, and ensure humanitarian accountability in providing these services.
  • Learn without fear report (2008)
    Learn without fear – and this report – focuses on the 66 countries in which Plan operates, but aims to impact on the lives of children beyond Plan’s direct reach.
  • Glossary of Gender Terms and Concepts (2008)
    This glossary was developed for USAID’s Office of Women in Development by the EQUATE Project, Management Systems International (Prime Contractor).
  • Education from a Gender Equality Perspective (2008)
    Using an approach that takes into account the relations and interaction between males and females (also known as gender dynamics), the Gender Equality Framework addresses four dimensions of equality in education. These are: equality of access, equality in the learning process, equality of educational outcomes, and equality of external results. Sections on each of the four dimensions include concrete activities that can be implemented as part of an overall strategy to achieve gender equality in education. Additional examples are provided through the use of text boxes, which highlight successful USAID education interventions.
  • Gender Equality Framework (2008)
    This document introduces a simple framework within which often misunderstood terms and concepts are reviewed in easily understood terminology. The Gender Equality Framework is based on the results from USAID education program assessments conducted during the past decade that revealed the need for a tool to help USAID move education programming toward achieving gender equality.
  • The Right to Education (2008)
    This four-page brochure guides the reader through the salient points of the right to education. It lists the main attributes of the relevant UN Conventions, their implementation and monitoring.
  • Global School Report 2008: No Excuses! (2008)
    A global report card ranking governments efforts to achieve Education for All.
  • What’s the Difference?: Confronting Factors that Affect Gender Equality in Education (2008)
    Since its launch in May 2002, the East Asia and Pacific Regional UN Girls’ Education Initiative (UNGEI) has sought to establish networks and partnerships among experts and organizations promoting gender equality in education. The goal of the regional group is to ensure the availability of quality education for all girls and boys across the region. The group works within the framework of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); the Dakar Framework for Action, Education for All; the Beijing Platform for Action; and the World Fit for Children.
  • Equals: Issue 21, July 2008 (2008)
    Newsletter for Beyond Access: Gender, Education and Development
  • Meeting the Challenge of Change - AED 2007-2008 Annual Report (2008)
    Change. It’s happening faster than ever. Today people are struggling just to keep up with change. Some stay apace. A few get ahead. For many of the world's people, change-even positive change-leaves them behind completely. AED is meeting the challenge of change in the U.S. and developing countries.
  • Poverty and economic vulnerability in South Asia: Does it impact girls' education? (2008)
    This series of papers aimed at promoting better education in South Asia grew out of collaboration between the UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia and the newly formed UN Girls’ Education Initiative, and had its genesis at a Regional Meeting on Accelerating Girls’ Education in South Asia in February 2005.
  • Gender mainstreaming: Does it happen in education in South Asia? (2008)
    This series of papers aimed at promoting better education in South Asia grew out of collaboration between the UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia and the newly formed UN Girls’ Education Initiative, and had its genesis at a Regional Meeting on Accelerating Girls’ Education in South Asia in February 2005.
  • Progress in girls' education: The challenge of gender equality in South Asia (2008)
    This series of papers aimed at promoting better education in South Asia grew out of collaboration between the UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia and the newly formed UN Girls’ Education Initiative, and had its genesis at a Regional Meeting on Accelerating Girls’ Education in South Asia in February 2005.
  • From parity to equality in girls' education: How are we doing in South Asia? (2008)
    This series of papers aimed at promoting better education in South Asia grew out of collaboration between the UNICEF Regional Office for South Asia and the newly formed UN Girls’ Education Initiative, and had its genesis at a Regional Meeting on Accelerating Girls’ Education in South Asia in February 2005.
  • New Partnerships for EFA: Building on Experience (2008)
    Moves to expand partnerships for development to involve the private sector, including business, foundations and a wide range of civil society organizations, have gathered strength in recent years.
  • Where Peace Begins – Education’s role in conflict prevention and peacebuilding (2008)
    Part of the purpose of this report is to set out – on the basis of Save the Children’s experience – what they believe to be the impact of conflict on children and on their education. The report also sets out Save the Children's understanding of how education can make conflicts worse and how education – the right sort of education – can support peace. However, describing how the right sort of quality education can lead to peace and how the wrong sort can make conflict worse will only get us so far. We need to find ways of making quality education a reality in conflict-affected fragile states around the world.
  • Improving the Education Response to HIV and AIDS (2008)
    This report synthesises case study exercises undertaken to examine the quality, effectiveness and coordination of the education sector’s response to the HIV epidemic in four countries – Jamaica, Kenya, Thailand and Zambia.
  • Learning from Girls’ Education as an Organizational Priority (2008)
    This report highlights themes of particular importance to basic education, especially for girls, as emphasized in the first MTSP. The report also discusses briefly the broader role and functions of UNICEF studies and evaluations in education related to these priority areas, as requested in the original terms of reference.
  • Making Schools Inclusive (2008)
    This book is about how non-governmental organisations (NGOs) can help school systems in developing countries become more inclusive. It shares experience of developing tools and approaches that have improved education for the most excluded children in society.
  • Global Task Force on Child Labour and Education for All (GTF) - Newsletter No.3 (2008)
    March 2008 newsletter from IPEC
  • Girls Count (2008)
    One person in eight is a girl or young woman age 10–24. Young people are the fastest growing segment of the population in developing countries, and their welfare is a fundamental input for key economic and social outcomes -- including the size and competitiveness of tomorrow's labor force, future economic growth, improved governance, and healthy civil societies.
  • The Road Not Traveled (2008)
    Education Reform in the Middle East and North Africa
  • The Nigerian Child (2008)
    Ensuring Education for All
  • INEE Case Studies
    The INEE Secretariat and the Women’s Commission are very pleased to inform you of the overwhelming response we have had to the call for case studies on Teacher Compensation.
  • Forced marriage of the girl child (2008)
    Report by the UN Commission on the Status of Women
  • New Partnerships for EFA: Building on Experience (2008)
    A global review
  • FAWE Strategic Plan 2008-2012
    In the last decade, significant steps have been made towardsachieving gender equality in education across Africa. Many sub-Saharan Africa countries have now concrete interventions to ensure free and compulsory primary education for all.
  • Toolkit for Mainstreaming HIV and AIDS in the Education Sector: Guidelines for Development Cooperation Agencies
    This toolkit aims to help education staff from development cooperation agencies, including both development and humanitarian-oriented multilateral and bilateral agencies as well as non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and other civil society organizations, to support the process of mainstreaming HIV and AIDS into education sector planning and implementation.

 

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