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The Untapped Opportunity: How Public-Private Partnerships Can Advance Education for All (2006)

This report highlights 4 areas in which public-private partnerships can make investments that matter: entry, retention, learning and inequality.

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©AED
Publication Date: 2006
Author/Publisher: AED (Academy for Educational Development)
Language: English

Download: PDF

A new AED report shows that while great advancements have been made in primary enrollment rates worldwide, still 34% of all children will not complete primary school. In many developing countries, fewer than one in five of all students complete secondary school.

The report, The Untapped Opportunity: How Public-Private Partnerships Can Advance Education for All, highlights four areas in which public-private partnerships can make investments that matter:

Entry: Because there is a shortage of school buildings, businesses can partner with governments and communities to build schools closer to where students live in order to increase entry rates. These partnerships can also work to educate the public on the need for education, and advocate for policy and program improvements.

Retention: To keep children in schools, business can use their expertise in market analysis to investigate why 25 percent of children drop out of school before completing the primary level. Working with communities, businesses can suggest solutions to the problem and create incentive programs to keep students in school and find future employment.

Learning: The quality of learning varies considerably from country-to-country and school-to-school. To improve learning, businesses can contribute to curriculum development and teacher training programs, and work with schools on effective human resource management.

Inequality: Inequalities in all areas of education remain a serious problem. Girls and children who are poor, or from rural areas, are least likely to access high-quality education. Businesses can use their communications expertise to create campaigns that stress the benefits of educating girls and marginalized children.


 

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